Fil-Am wins gold in Olympics for USA in fencing

FIlipino-American fencer Lee Kiefer has won the gold medal at the women’s individual foil event at the Tokyo Olympics on Sunday night.

The 27-year-old Kiefer, who represents the United States, defeated former Olympic and world champion Inna Deriglazova from Russia 15-13 at the Makuhari Messe convention center in Chiba to capture her first Olympic gold medal.

Russia’s Larisa Korobeynikova had captured the bronze medal after defeating Italy’s Alice Volpi 15-14.

It is the United States’ first gold medal for this event.

Kiefer, who previously competed in London in 2012 and Rio de Janeiro in 2016, had won gold medals at the Pan American Games in 2011, 2015, and 2019.

Her mother, Teresa, had immigrated from the Philippines to the US as a child.

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Fil-Am wins gold in Olympics for USA in fencing

FIlipino-American fencer Lee Kiefer has won the gold medal at the women’s individual foil event at the Tokyo Olympics on Sunday night.

The 27-year-old Kiefer, who represents the United States, defeated former Olympic and world champion Inna Deriglazova from Russia 15-13 at the Makuhari Messe convention center in Chiba to capture her first Olympic gold medal.

Russia’s Larisa Korobeynikova had captured the bronze medal after defeating Italy’s Alice Volpi 15-14.

It is the United States’ first gold medal for this event.

Kiefer, who previously competed in London in 2012 and Rio de Janeiro in 2016, had won gold medals at the Pan American Games in 2011, 2015, and 2019.

Her mother, Teresa, had immigrated from the Philippines to the US as a child.

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Pope Francis at Angelus: With our small offering, Jesus can do great things


Pope Francis waves during the Angelus at the Vatican July 18, 2021. / Vatican Media/CNA.

Vatican City, Jul 25, 2021 / 05:10 am (CNA).

With our small offering, Jesus can do great things, just like when he multiplied five loaves and three fishes to feed thousands, Pope Francis said Sunday.

“It would be good to ask ourselves every day: ‘What do I bring to Jesus today?’” the pope said during his weekly Angelus message July 25.

Speaking from a window of the apostolic palace, Francis said Jesus “can do a lot with one of our prayers, with a gesture of charity for others, even with one of our sufferings handed over to His mercy.”

“[We give] our small things to Jesus and he works miracles. This is how God loves to act: He does great things, starting from small, freely-given ones.”

Pope Francis has been convalescing at the Vatican since being released from hospital 10 days after undergoing colon surgery July 4. During July, the pope typically does not hold public audiences or meetings, though he has continued to give his weekly Angelus address.

On Sunday he reflected on the day’s Gospel passage from St. John, which recounts Jesus’ miracle of the multiplication of five loaves and two fishes to feed 5,000 people.

The pope said it is interesting that Jesus does not create the food from nothing; his disciples ask one boy to share everything he has to eat: “It seems to be an unreasonable proposal. Actually, unjust.”

“Why take away from one person what is not enough to feed everyone anyway?” he continued. “In human terms, it is illogical. But not for God. On the contrary, thanks to that small freely-given and therefore heroic gift, Jesus is able to feed everyone.”

“This is a great lesson for us. It tells us that the Lord can do a lot with the little that we put at His disposal,” he underlined.

Francis explained that this is the logic of Jesus Christ, and a quality holy people throughout history have demonstrated.

We often try “to accumulate and increase what we have, but Jesus asks us to give, to diminish,” he said.

Drawing attention to the tragedy of hunger which exists in the world today, he cited calculations which estimate that around the world, 7,000 children under the age of five die every day due to malnutrition.

He said “faced with scandals such as these, Jesus also addresses an invitation to us, an invitation similar to the one probably received by the boy in the Gospel, who has no name and in whom we can all see ourselves.”

The invitation is to “be brave, give what little you have, your talents and your possessions, make them available to Jesus and to your brothers and sisters. Do not be afraid, nothing will be lost, because if you share, God will multiply. Banish the false modesty of feeling inadequate, trust yourself. Believe in love, believe in the power of service, believe in the strength of gratuitousness.”

After praying the Angelus in Latin, Pope Francis recalled that July 25 this year marks the first World Day of Grandparents and the Elderly.

He asked people gathered in St. Peter’s Square to offer a round of applause for grandparents.

“Grandparents and grandchildren, young and old together manifested one of the beautiful faces of the Church and showed the covenant between the generations,” he said, inviting people to visit the lonely older members of our society.

“I ask the Lord that this celebration will help us who are more advanced in years to respond to his call in this season of life, and to show society the value of the presence of grandparents and the elderly,” he stated.

Noting that the 32nd Olympic Games began in Tokyo on July 23, Pope Francis said “in this time of pandemic, these games are a sign of hope, a sign of universal fraternity in the name of healthy competition.”

“God bless the organizers, the athletes and all who collaborate for this great celebration of sports.”

The pope also expressed his sympathy after a heavy rainfall in Zhengzhou, the capital city of China’s Henan province, caused floods killing at least 33 people last week.

The dramatic floods, which caused landslides and overwhelmed dams, have submerged neighborhoods and trapped passengers in subway cars, according to CNN.

Henan authorities said last week the heavy rains in the province have displaced hundreds of thousands of people and caused an estimated $190 million in economic damage.

Pope Francis said he is praying for the victims and their families and expressed his solidarity with those who are suffering from the tragedy.

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49% of Filipinos said quality of life worsened – SWS

Almost half of Filipinos surveyed by the Social Weather Stations (SWS) said that their quality of life got worse compared to a year ago.

The survey held from June 23 to 26 showed that 49 percent of those polled said their quality of life deteriorated, 18 percent said that it got better and 33 percent said it stayed the same.

This resulted in a net gainers score of -31 percent, classified by SWS as very low. This was 7 points higher than the net gainers score in May 2021.

The trend also showed “continuing recovery from the catastrophic levels of -78 in May 2020, -72 in July 2020, and -76 in September 2020, the pollster said.

Moreover, 37 percent of the respondents of the survey said that they believe that their quality of life will improve in the next twelve months, 7 percent said that it will worsen, and 42 percent said that it will stay the same. The remaining 14 percent did not give an answer.

This resulted in a +30 net personal optimism score, which is 6 points higher than in May 2021, but 5 points below the +35 in November 2020.

SWS surveyed 1,200 respondents nationwide using face-to-face interviews. The survey has an error margin of ±3 percent.

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49% of Filipinos said quality of life worsened – SWS

Almost half of Filipinos surveyed by the Social Weather Stations (SWS) said that their quality of life got worse compared to a year ago.

The survey held from June 23 to 26 showed that 49 percent of those polled said their quality of life deteriorated, 18 percent said that it got better and 33 percent said it stayed the same.

This resulted in a net gainers score of -31 percent, classified by SWS as very low. This was 7 points higher than the net gainers score in May 2021.

The trend also showed “continuing recovery from the catastrophic levels of -78 in May 2020, -72 in July 2020, and -76 in September 2020, the pollster said.

Moreover, 37 percent of the respondents of the survey said that they believe that their quality of life will improve in the next twelve months, 7 percent said that it will worsen, and 42 percent said that it will stay the same. The remaining 14 percent did not give an answer.

This resulted in a +30 net personal optimism score, which is 6 points higher than in May 2021, but 5 points below the +35 in November 2020.

SWS surveyed 1,200 respondents nationwide using face-to-face interviews. The survey has an error margin of ±3 percent.

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Behind the durability of institutions

Administrations — or governments, as they are called in Europe — may come and go, but even the worst of them do not leave lasting damage on society if the institutions are strong. Institutions are the formed routines of collective living that are protected by society’s system of norms and rules. They are the basic […]

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‘Liberty, prosperity, rule of law’

These are the keywords and ideas that patriotic, talented, and trustworthy law school juniors and seniors have to believe in and promote to obtain scholarships and/or to win dissertation-writing prizes from the Foundation for Liberty and Prosperity (FLP) and its partners, the Tan Yan Kee Foundation (TYKF) and the Ayala Corporation (AC), respectively. Headed by […]

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Meet the Pastor of the First Gypsy Greek Catholic Church


Fr. Árpád Kanyó in the first Romani, or Gypsy, Greek Catholic church. / EWTN News In Depth

Nyiregyhaza, Hungary, Jul 24, 2021 / 15:00 pm (CNA).

When Fr. Árpád Kanyó first arrived at his current parish, he didn’t know the language or culture of the people there. But he quickly learned about – and embraced – the new community he encountered.

80 years ago, Fr. Miklos Soja established the first Romani, or Gypsy, Greek Catholic church in Hungary. He wanted a place where the Romani could pray the liturgy in their native language. Today, Fr. Kanyó serves as the pastor of the Greek Catholic Church of the Ascension. He spoke with EWTN News In Depth about his experience in a segment that aired July 16.

Fr. Kanyó arrived in 2014, with his wife and three young daughters, as in the Eastern Catholic Churches married men can be ordained to the priesthood.

“When I came here to Hodász, I had to celebrate the liturgy in the Roma language,” he remembered. “Before the ceremony, I turned to the congregation and I said, ‘I’m sorry, but I’m going to do the first non-Hungarian liturgy of my life. If I say something ridiculous or ugly, please forgive me.’”

“When the liturgy was over,” Fr. Kanyó continued, “one of the believers came to me and said, ‘Father, of all the priests, your liturgy has been the best so far.’”

He hopes to provide a good example of Christian and family life. But he and his family are also learning from the Romani. His wife, Mária, said she fell in love with the culture and tradition of the parishioners.

“When I saw them dancing for the first time, I was fascinated,” she recalled. “And when we moved here and I heard them singing during the liturgy in the Roman language, that brought tears to my eyes.” She also admires their traditional clothing.

“For me, dance and conversations with them are so important and I am always friendly and available to them,” she stressed.

Their culture and community, in many ways, centers on dance and music. As the cantor and lay president of the parish, Sándor Lakatos highlighted the importance of fellowship.

“For me, the Greek Catholic faith means a strong community,” he said. “It’s like heaven, where everyone has a place. One has to belong somewhere. For me, Greek Catholicism means a family where we gather around and talk, rejoice and sometimes cry together.”

At the same time, the community also faces challenges. The church has lost parishioners like Ahmed Hanzam, who emphasized that he’s living through a difficult period in his life right now.

“It was different long ago,” he said. “People had solidarity. Now there is no cohesion.”

The village also suffers from unemployment and a lack of higher education. Many are forced to move far away only to work in unqualified jobs. 

And, according to Fr. Kanyó, “many Hungarians from this village also go far to work in factories.”

“That is why it’s our great task to forge and keep those belonging to our Roma people, or as we call them here, Gypsy community, together,” he said.

He strives to follow in the footsteps of Fr. Miklos Soja.

“He didn’t look at how difficult it was for the people here, who at that time lived in huts dug into the ground,” Fr. Kanyó said, “He came down to them and brought joy into the midst of their hardship.”

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